misc. stuff
       
     
 It's one of a few pre-ArtCenter projects that don't make me cringe.
       
     
 My reinterpretation of The Misfits' classic Walk Among Us as an old mariachi album.
       
     
 This album cover was an assignment for a photography class that turned out to be a lot of fun. First, our instructor gave the class a brief rundown on Blue Note Records album covers, then she presented us with a list of artists and album titles that we weren't allowed to look up. We then had to sift through our contact sheets for throwaway images to turn into our own interpretation of a cover to go with our chosen title.
       
     
 This was part of a subscription box packaging project at ArtCenter that I'm currently getting back onto my site.
       
     
 A few years ago I decided to throw together a fake Fugazi tour annoucement for Instagram on April Fool's Day. 
       
     
 The following year I tried to prank friends with another fake tour. The image managed to confuse a member of one of the hypothetical opening bands, which I was kind of stoked about. 
       
     
 After learning that Morrissey had been closing shows on a recent tour with the Smiths song, " Shoplifters of the World Unite ;" which had previously inspired me to create a labor union logo based on it,  I designed and  Risograph -printed posters for friends of mine who also saw him during his Hollywood Bowl dates.
       
     
 This is another piece from my printmaking class. The top layer is screen printed, the layer below that is an intaglio photoplate print of some Clash record spines, and the bottom level is made up of strips of found printed paper that had its toner transferred off of it and onto the substrate.
       
     
 This gig poster, for a re-formed Black Flag from a couple years before ArtCenter, definitely makes me cringe, but I'm super proud to have done it. I had become associated with a short-lived incarnation of The Vex, an old East L.A. punk club, and approached the owner about designing a gig poster for the show. He initially gave me the go-ahead to get them printed after I showed him a couple of sketches and pitched it as a tribute to the venue's history, but then changed his mind for a while.  A week before the show, after relentlessly pestering him, he finally let me go ahead and have them screen printed (I wanted to make sure the posters turned out well, so I had a buddy of mine on standby to do the printing), but he had one condition: I couldn't use the band's iconic logo. He was worried about being sued by Black Flag's sole original member and guitarist. No matter how much I tried to convince him he was crazy because the band would get a cut from the sales, he stood his ground. I instead went with a fake distressed typeface and some brush stroked for the bars.  If I made that poster today, it would be done differently: The Black Flag logo would get a faithful revision, all of the distressed; old label maker; and stencil typefaces would be done for real, and I wouldn't subconsciously rip Raymond Pettibone off so hard by drawing something else or in a different style. Despite how slightly-embarrassed I still am by this, I'm still extremely glad I had the opportunity to officially make something for a band whose songs I had played in punk bands as a teenager.
       
     
misc. stuff
       
     
misc. stuff

Hello Nuclear Blast,

These are a few other music-related projects that didn't fit anywhere else but are definitely relevant in this situation.

A couple years before I started at ArtCenter, a friend of mine who works at Amoeba Music gave me a big box of records that the store couldn't get rid of. The box was full of gems so I decided to digitize some of the records and make a compilation to put on my website. I managed to get the cover art done before my cheap USB turntable broke and the project got shelved.

 It's one of a few pre-ArtCenter projects that don't make me cringe.
       
     

It's one of a few pre-ArtCenter projects that don't make me cringe.

 My reinterpretation of The Misfits' classic Walk Among Us as an old mariachi album.
       
     

My reinterpretation of The Misfits' classic Walk Among Us as an old mariachi album.

 This album cover was an assignment for a photography class that turned out to be a lot of fun. First, our instructor gave the class a brief rundown on Blue Note Records album covers, then she presented us with a list of artists and album titles that we weren't allowed to look up. We then had to sift through our contact sheets for throwaway images to turn into our own interpretation of a cover to go with our chosen title.
       
     

This album cover was an assignment for a photography class that turned out to be a lot of fun. First, our instructor gave the class a brief rundown on Blue Note Records album covers, then she presented us with a list of artists and album titles that we weren't allowed to look up. We then had to sift through our contact sheets for throwaway images to turn into our own interpretation of a cover to go with our chosen title.

 This was part of a subscription box packaging project at ArtCenter that I'm currently getting back onto my site.
       
     

This was part of a subscription box packaging project at ArtCenter that I'm currently getting back onto my site.

 A few years ago I decided to throw together a fake Fugazi tour annoucement for Instagram on April Fool's Day. 
       
     

A few years ago I decided to throw together a fake Fugazi tour annoucement for Instagram on April Fool's Day. 

 The following year I tried to prank friends with another fake tour. The image managed to confuse a member of one of the hypothetical opening bands, which I was kind of stoked about. 
       
     

The following year I tried to prank friends with another fake tour. The image managed to confuse a member of one of the hypothetical opening bands, which I was kind of stoked about. 

 After learning that Morrissey had been closing shows on a recent tour with the Smiths song, " Shoplifters of the World Unite ;" which had previously inspired me to create a labor union logo based on it,  I designed and  Risograph -printed posters for friends of mine who also saw him during his Hollywood Bowl dates.
       
     

After learning that Morrissey had been closing shows on a recent tour with the Smiths song, "Shoplifters of the World Unite;" which had previously inspired me to create a labor union logo based on it,  I designed and Risograph-printed posters for friends of mine who also saw him during his Hollywood Bowl dates.

 This is another piece from my printmaking class. The top layer is screen printed, the layer below that is an intaglio photoplate print of some Clash record spines, and the bottom level is made up of strips of found printed paper that had its toner transferred off of it and onto the substrate.
       
     

This is another piece from my printmaking class. The top layer is screen printed, the layer below that is an intaglio photoplate print of some Clash record spines, and the bottom level is made up of strips of found printed paper that had its toner transferred off of it and onto the substrate.

 This gig poster, for a re-formed Black Flag from a couple years before ArtCenter, definitely makes me cringe, but I'm super proud to have done it. I had become associated with a short-lived incarnation of The Vex, an old East L.A. punk club, and approached the owner about designing a gig poster for the show. He initially gave me the go-ahead to get them printed after I showed him a couple of sketches and pitched it as a tribute to the venue's history, but then changed his mind for a while.  A week before the show, after relentlessly pestering him, he finally let me go ahead and have them screen printed (I wanted to make sure the posters turned out well, so I had a buddy of mine on standby to do the printing), but he had one condition: I couldn't use the band's iconic logo. He was worried about being sued by Black Flag's sole original member and guitarist. No matter how much I tried to convince him he was crazy because the band would get a cut from the sales, he stood his ground. I instead went with a fake distressed typeface and some brush stroked for the bars.  If I made that poster today, it would be done differently: The Black Flag logo would get a faithful revision, all of the distressed; old label maker; and stencil typefaces would be done for real, and I wouldn't subconsciously rip Raymond Pettibone off so hard by drawing something else or in a different style. Despite how slightly-embarrassed I still am by this, I'm still extremely glad I had the opportunity to officially make something for a band whose songs I had played in punk bands as a teenager.
       
     

This gig poster, for a re-formed Black Flag from a couple years before ArtCenter, definitely makes me cringe, but I'm super proud to have done it. I had become associated with a short-lived incarnation of The Vex, an old East L.A. punk club, and approached the owner about designing a gig poster for the show. He initially gave me the go-ahead to get them printed after I showed him a couple of sketches and pitched it as a tribute to the venue's history, but then changed his mind for a while.

A week before the show, after relentlessly pestering him, he finally let me go ahead and have them screen printed (I wanted to make sure the posters turned out well, so I had a buddy of mine on standby to do the printing), but he had one condition: I couldn't use the band's iconic logo. He was worried about being sued by Black Flag's sole original member and guitarist. No matter how much I tried to convince him he was crazy because the band would get a cut from the sales, he stood his ground. I instead went with a fake distressed typeface and some brush stroked for the bars.

If I made that poster today, it would be done differently: The Black Flag logo would get a faithful revision, all of the distressed; old label maker; and stencil typefaces would be done for real, and I wouldn't subconsciously rip Raymond Pettibone off so hard by drawing something else or in a different style. Despite how slightly-embarrassed I still am by this, I'm still extremely glad I had the opportunity to officially make something for a band whose songs I had played in punk bands as a teenager.